Switch to FSC-certified products and save tigers

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To a tiger, the forest is life.

It provides trees for shade, rivers for drinking water, and ideal hunting grounds for ambushing prey. One of the best ways to protect forests so that tigers and other wildlife thrive is to buy products that have the Forest Stewardship Council™ (FSC®) label.

The FSC label means the product is from a responsibly managed forest—one where trees are harvested legally, highly hazardous pesticides are not used, the rights of indigenous people are protected, and more.

And it can be found almost everywhere, as every part of a tree is used to make products—like rubber for shoes and bark for corks.

Simple everyday decisions can make a major impact on saving forests—and tigers.

You can help

Choices that lead to saving tiger forests start with you.

The FSC logo makes it easy to make the right choice when buying products that come from forests.

Can you spot where you could have FSC products:

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Bedroom

Bed frame, fan, rubber-soled sneakers

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Bathroom

Toilet paper, bandages

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Study

Desk, chair, printer paper, greeting cards

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Kitchen

Cutting board, pepper mill, cabinets, wine rack, wine cork

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Living and Dining Rooms

Coffee table, bench, picture frame, floor

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Office/Cubicle

Ceiling panels, desks, chairs, speakers, cell phone cases

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Break Room

Utensils, napkins, paper towels

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Copy room

Paper, counters

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Mail room

Envelopes, packaging, mailbox shelf

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Classroom

Easels, counters, books, paper, pencils, storage crates, posters

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Restroom

Toilet paper, toilet seat covers

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Auditorium

Chairs, stage floor

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Gym

Floor, soccer balls, bleachers

Learn more

To save tigers people need to know the facts.

Every tiger has its own distinct pattern of stripes; they're as unique as our human fingerprints.

Tigers need an abundance of prey: A single tiger can eat up to 88 pounds of meat at one time.

97% of wild tigers have been lost in the past 100 years. As few as 3,200 tigers are now in the wild.

Tigers are actually excellent swimmers and often cool off in various bodies of water.